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The Two Gentlemen of Verona

Please see each scene for explanatory notes.
Please see the bottom of this page for helpful Two Gentlemen of Verona resources.


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In the Spotlight

Quote in Context

microsoft imagesI think Crab, my dog, be the sourest-natured
dog that lives: my mother weeping, my father
wailing, my sister crying, our maid howling, our cat
wringing her hands, and all our house in a great
perplexity, yet did not this cruel-hearted cur shed
one tear: he is a stone, a very pebble stone, and
has no more pity in him than a dog.
                           The Two Gentlemen of Verona (2.3), Launce

"Launce and Speed are servants: born to serve, contented to serve, with little or no ambition beyond it. They are personal attendants on Valentine and Proteus, two young noblemen, and accompany their respective masters on their travels, obeying their orders without question, accepting their wages with satisfaction, and submitting upon occasion to personal chastisement without resentment." Read on...