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Macbeth Soliloquy Glossary: Is this a dagger which I see before me (2.1.33-61)

stones prate (55)

i.e., the stones speak.
Macbeth knows that, although those around him are unaware of his crimes, the earth and the heavens know all. Notice also the connection to Habakkuk 2.10,11: "Thou hast consulted shame to thine own house, by destroying many people, and hast sinned against thine own soule. For the stone shall cry out of the wall and the beam out of the timber shall answer it, woe unto him that buildeth a town with blood". For more biblical imagery in this passage see my article: Biblical Imagery in Macbeth.

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How to cite this article:
Mabillard, Amanda. Macbeth Soliloquy Glossary. Shakespeare Online. 20 Aug. 2000. (date when you accessed the information) < >.


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