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So am I as the rich, whose blessed key
Can bring him to his sweet up-locked treasure,
The which he will not every hour survey,
For blunting the fine point of seldom pleasure.
Therefore are feasts so solemn and so rare,
Since, seldom coming, in the long year set,
Like stones of worth they thinly placed are,
Or captain jewels in the carconet.
So is the time that keeps you as my chest,
Or as the wardrobe which the robe doth hide,
To make some special instant special blest,
By new unfolding his imprison'd pride.
   Blessed are you, whose worthiness gives scope,
   Being had, to triumph, being lack'd, to hope.


LII. The return, it may be supposed, has now taken place. The delight which the poet takes in his friend's society is so great that there is danger lest its keenness should be dulled and diminished if it were too frequently indulged in. Festal days, on account of their rarity, are more highly esteemed. A precious jewel in the casket, or a rich garment in the wardrobe, gives greater joy when not too often seen. So should it be with his friend's society to be prized triumphantly when present, and hoped for when absent.

4. For blunting. Lest he should blunt.

8. Captain jewels in the carconet. The principal jewels in the string constituting the necklace or carconet (so spelled here in Q.).

9. The time during which Mr. W. H. is away is like the casket which keeps a jewel from view.

12. His imprison'd pride. The splendid garment, the pride of the wardrobe.

How to cite this article:
Shakespeare, William. Sonnets. Ed. Thomas Tyler. London: D. Nutt, 1890. Shakespeare Online. 10 Jan. 2014. < >.

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